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Breads

These tiny sandwiches are great when you need to dream up finger food, but are particularly good as part of a late, lazy afternoon tea.

If your charcoal fire is anything like ours, it’s always warm enough to braai (barbecue) just one last little something after the meat and wors (South African sausage) have been braaied to perfection. For us, that last little something has got to be braaibroodjies, because a braai is simply not perfect without these delicacies: crunchy brown on the outside, but soft and wonderfully flavoursome inside.

Scrolls are delicious and economical, and great fun to make and eat. We enjoy them as morning or afternoon snacks, served as a side when we have soup, and in our lunch boxes.

When you ran out of bread in the house and don't have time to bake any, try this quick vetkoek recipe.

Vetkoek is essentially deep fried buns that can be eaten with anything from apricot jam to curry mince. It is somewhat similar to Dutch "oliebollen", the main diference being that oliebollen are sweet and contains raisins.

Traditional vetkoek is made from yeast bread dough, but this quick and easy vetkoek recipe use baking powder as the raising agent.

Marietjie's grandmother (who lived in the Namakwaland in South Africa), made the most delicious "skuinskoek". Skuinskoek means "diagonal cakes", probably because of the peculiar diamond form one need to cut them out.

They are on their best when they are warm and fresh, but Marietjie's grandmother often made skuinskoek for "padkos": food for the road back home after a visit. She stored them in a washed fabric flour bag, which kept them for a day or two, but a modern cake tin or Tupperware container is also fine.

This is not the original recipe, but a variant that is based on Marietjie's mosbolletjie rusks, using Surebake yeast and a bread maker.