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South Africans love their buttermilk rusks (karringmelk beskuit), and for good reason too: they have a lovely flavour, and because you use self-raising flour, it is easy to them make at home. You can even make your own buttermilk by adding lemon juice to normal milk.

There is only one downside to eating buttermilk rusks: you need to time your dunk perfectly, if you don’t want the bottom half of your rusk to break off and sink to the bottom of your cup. These egg-free buttermilk rusks​ are denser, and therefore less likely to come apart and splash into your coffee. (Jaco can vouch for this, he’s got a whole container of egg-free rusks at work.)​

Chocolate brownies are a convenient source of chocolate. With chocolate being the most important of the five food groups, you ought to plan your day carefully so that you do not get caught without it during either morning or afternoon tea. The problem with chocolate brownies, of course, is that they are at their fudgy best when you take them out of the oven, but we found it works well to eat half of it on the spot, and the rest a bit later.
Custard and almonds add a delicate flavour to rusks.The original recipe for custard and almond rusks appeared in Woman's Value, back in 1998. It is about time to put it under people's noses again, so here's Marietjie's version, which introduces just a hint of spice.
Here is a classic recipe for coconut ice, but with a modern tweak.Marietjie's mother got the recipe from Aunt Hetty Gouws. Aunt Hetty used a drop of red food colouring for the pink coconut icing, but because we avoid artificial food colouring when we can, Marietjie experimented with natural freeze-dried raspberry powder, with excellent results.
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